intuitionism

<logic, philosophy of science, moral philosophy> reliance on unmediated awareness as a criterion of truth. In logic and mathematics, intuitionism denies the independent reality of mathematical objects and the principle of excluded middle. In moral philosophy, intuitionism is the metaethical theory that moral judgments are made by reference to a direct, non-inferential awareness of moral value. Ethical intuitionists usually hold that we recognize our duties in the specific features of particular moral decisions. Recommended Reading: Gisele Fischer Servi, Intuitionism and Models of Cognition (Giro, 1996); Michael Dummett, Elements of Intuitionism (Oxford, 2000); Grant C. Sterling, Ethical Intuitionism and Its Critics (Peter Lang, 1994); and James Q. Wilson, Moral Intuitions (Transaction, 2000).

[A Dictionary of Philosophical Terms and Names]

<2002-1-18>

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Nearby terms: intertextuality « intrinsic - extrinsic « intrinsicism « intuitionism » intuitionism » intuitionistic logic » invariant

intuitionism

<ethics, philosophy of mathematics> 1. in ethics the term refers to the doctrine (popular in Britain around the turn of the century) that all of our moral judgments are made through an appeal to our moral intuitions or "moral sense". This ethical doctrine is derived from a more general idea in epistemology dating back to Plato: namely, a radical intrinsicism which holds that all of our knowledge is gained through intuition, immediate insight, or spiritual vision of a transcendent higher reality. In addition, the movement of ethical intuitionism picked up on the ideas of the earlier "moral sense theorists" such as David Hume (1711-1776) and Adam Smith (1723-1790). Even though intuitionism is a form of intrinsicism, it ends up being a kind of subjectivism, in which the justification for ethical values is the fact that a certain person or philosopher thinks they are true. Historically, intuitionism has tended to be a kind of deontologism, although the cause may have been simply the beliefs of the intuitionists themselves and not anything about intuitionism in general. (References from emotionalism and mysticism.)

[The Ism Book]

2. in philosophy of mathematics see intuitionistic logic

Edited by Giovanni Benzi

<2001-04-28>

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Nearby terms: intrinsic - extrinsic « intrinsicism « intuitionism « intuitionism » intuitionistic logic » invariant » inverse